Category: HCI

A/B testing, also known as split testing, is the method of pitting two versions of a landing page against each other in a battle of conversion. You test to see which version does a better job of leading visitors to one of your goals, like signing up or subscribing to a newsletter. You can test two entirely different designs for a landing page or you can test small tweaks, like changes to a few words in your copy. (more…)

Many people in the usability community regard Steve Krug’s book Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition as the laypersons usability bible. This book explains briefly and concisely everything one needs to know about getting started with web usability. For more advanced users, it’s a great refresher course.


UX Booth has been open for more than half a year now, and when we started I was always regarded as the layperson of the group. After getting all serious about usability, I’ve re-read Steve Krug’s Don’t Make Me Think and pulled out what I consider to be the most insightful and best thoughts in this book. (more…)

Card sorting is a categorization technique where users sort cards describing and giving their picture, their understanding and their mental picture of concepts, workflows and information and knowledge. (more…)

Many people have asked themselves this question. We often find ourselves alone at the office wondering why we can’t fit into any specific department or, after so many evaluations, feel like we’re just not doing what it is that we really want to. (more…)

Here are the books we consider the most valuable reads for people interested in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). (more…)

The 10 most general principles for interaction design. They are called “heuristics” because they are more in the nature of rules of thumb than specific usability guidelines. (more…)

The origin of heuristics

Heuristics, a form of cognitive strategy, have been studied in discplines such as cognitive psychology, social psychology and social cognition. (more…)

The Lean philosophy was developed primarily by the Toyota Production System (TPS) as a concept to preserve value with less work. As a discipline matures, new methods are developed to improve the quality and reduce the costs of products and services. (more…)